Articles about Litigation

Preparing for a Litigation Surge in the Post-Pandemic World

The global coronavirus pandemic is a disruptive economic and public health event unlike any in recent memory. Few sectors remain untouched: 30 million Americans have filed for unemployment, non-essential businesses around the world have shuttered in response to shelter-in-place orders, and supply chains in every corner of the world are compromised. Even…

Read More

Russian LinkedIn Hacker Faces Charges in the U.S.

A Russian man accused of hacking numerous American companies was extradited from the Czech Republic to the United States in March 2018. Yevgeniy Nikulin, who allegedly hacked LinkedIn, Dropbox, and Formspring in 2012, used employee credentials for improper activity and also conspired to illegally sell the obtained data. Mr. Nikulin is facing…

Read More

Shaping the Future of Antitrust Law: Time Warner and AT&T

The US Justice Department and AT&T’s legal battle over the intended acquisition of Time Warner entered court in late March 2018. The trial is being presided over by Judge Richard Leon of the US District Court for the District of Columbia, and it has drawn interest from a myriad of experts from…

Read More

A Peek Into The Future of Autonomous Driving, Part 1

Future Self-Driving Cars of the Past– Advertising Archive, via Everett Collection In areas of science and technology where rapid disruption is prevalent, researchers and engineers are constantly surrounded by several challenges of varying degrees of urgency and complexity. In a continuous cycle, innovative solutions for solving these technological obstacles are found and…

Read More

Comcast Accused of Demanding Punitive Compensation from Rival

Wave Broadband, a rival of telecom giant Comcast, has filed a complaint with the FCC, accusing the company of demanding “a punitive ransom totaling nearly $3.5 million” in order to continue airing Comcast-owned sports programming. It is the latest in a series of grievances taken to the FCC by Comcast’s competitors, who…

Read More

Trade Secrets and Cover-Ups: The Case of Waymo vs. Uber

In February 2017, Waymo filed a lawsuit in San Francisco federal court against Uber, alleging theft of trade-secrets related to Waymo’s self-driving car technology. The lawsuit, full of twists and turns, was settled earlier this month, with Uber agreeing to pay $245 million in shares to Alphabet (Google), Waymo’s parent company. Below…

Read More

Lawsuit alleges Apple Pay Patent Violation

Kenneth Weiss, the former CTO and Chairman of the Board at RSA Security, sued Apple Inc. and Visa in May 2017. Mr. Weiss is the founder of Universal Secure Registry (USR) and the inventor of RSA’s SecurID technology, and he is alleging that Apple Pay violates various patents he owns related to…

Read More

Supreme Court to Hear Landmark Cellphone Surveillance Case

In what could arguably be labeled as one of the most consequential Supreme Court terms in decades, one particular case stands out within the realm of technology and privacy: Carpenter v. United States, No. 16-402. This case looms large as the Supreme Court seeks to determine the extent to which cell phone…

Read More

Jury Finds Apple Infringed Smartphone Patent

A patent trial in the District of Delaware between MobileMedia Ideas (MMI) and Apple ended with a jury finding of infringement by Apple and an award of $3 million to MMI. The patent at issue, U.S. Patent No. RE 39,231, described the invention of the “polite ignore” feature on cell phones for…

Read More

Open to Content: A Look at the Case for Net Neutrality

On June 14, 2016 the District of Columbia Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) Open Internet Rules. The Court’s ruling came after more than a decade of intense debate over the relationship between Internet Service Providers (ISPs), the Federal Government, and internet users. Twice before, attempts by the…

Read More